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Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. The longer a person goes without treatment, the greater the damage.

Symptoms of a heart attack may be immediate and intense. More often, though, symptoms start slowly and persist for hours, days or weeks before a heart attack. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest, the heart usually does not stop beating during a heart attack.

The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men

Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and often without warning. It is triggered by an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia).

With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Seconds later, a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment.



treatment will start in the ambulance with aspirin and other medicines

If you call , treatment will start in the ambulance with aspirin and other medicines.

treatment will start in the ambulance with aspirin and other medicines
In the hospital

In the hospital, the doctor will work right away to return blood flow to your heart. You may get medicines to break up and prevent blood clots. You may get nitroglycerin and other medicines that make your arteries wider. This helps improve blood flow and relieve symptoms, such as chest pain or pressure. You also may get pain medicine and oxygen.

Your test results will help your doctor decide about more treatment. You might have angioplasty or bypass surgery to improve blood flow to your heart.

test results

During angioplasty, doctors inflate a small balloon to open the artery. A stent, a wire mesh tube, may be permanently placed in the artery to keep it open. For hospitals not equipped to do angioplasty quickly, drugs may be used to dissolve blood clots, but more hospitals are making the procedure available in a timely manner, Bolger said.

angioplasty
take medicines that lower your risk of a heart attack

After you get out of the hospital, you will continue to take medicines that lower your risk of a heart attack. Medicine may include beta-blockers, aspirin or other medicines to prevent blood clots, blood pressure medicine, and cholesterol

If your doctor has not set you up with a cardiac rehab program, talk to him or her about whether that is right for you. In cardiac rehab, you will get education and support that help you make new, healthy habits, such as eating healthy food and getting more exercise.

In cardiac rehab, you will get education and support that help you make new, healthy habits


To determine what’s causing your symptoms, a doctor will take a careful medical history and give you a physical examination. If the doctor suspects an acute coronary syndrome, the following tests will be performed:

A doctor will give you a physical exam and ask about your symptoms and past health. He or she also will ask about your family’s health. You will have several tests to find out what is causing your symptoms.

How is acute coronary syndrome diagnosed?

An electrocardiogram can show whether you have angina or have had a heart attack. This test measures the electrical signals that control your heart’s rhythm. Small pads or patches will be taped to your chest and other areas of your body. They connect to a machine that traces the signals onto paper. The doctor will look for certain changes on the graph to see if your heart is not getting enough blood or if you are having a heart attack.

How is acute coronary syndrome diagnosed?
A blood test will look for a rise in cardiac enzymes. The heart releases these substances when it is damaged.
A blood test

In some cases, you might have a test called a cardiac perfusion scan to see if your heart is getting enough blood. It also can be used to check for areas of damage  after a heart attack.

a cardiac perfusion scan

If tests confirm blood flow to the heart has been blocked, doctors will work quickly to reopen the artery.



top of the plaque buildup

Unstable angina happens when blood flow to the heart is suddenly slowed by narrowed coronary arteries. Or small blood clots form in the coronary arteries and slow blood flow. Typically, there is no damage to the heart muscle. It often happens when you are at rest.

You may have had stable angina You knew when to expect your symptoms, such as when you exercised. Stable angina usually goes away when you rest or take your angina medicine. But the symptoms of unstable angina may not go away with rest or medicine. It may get worse or happen at times that it didn’t before. Unstable angina symptoms may mean that you are having a heart attack.

Three types of angina
A heart attack means

A heart attack means

heart attack means a coronary artery has been blocked and the heart has been damaged. Without blood flow and oxygen, part of the heart starts to die.



ACS ranges from a heart attack (myocardial infarction) to unstable angina.

Heart attack (myocardial infarction)

If you have a heart attack, a coronary artery or one of its smaller branches is suddenly blocked. The part of the heart muscle supplied by this artery loses its blood (and oxygen) supply. This part of the heart muscle is at risk of dying unless the blockage is quickly undone. (The word infarction means death of some tissue due to a blocked artery which stops blood from getting past.) In addition to being known as a heart attack, a myocardial infarction is sometimes called a coronary thrombosis.

Heart attack (myocardial infarction)

Three types of angina:

Stable angina

Unstable angina

Variant angina

Classic angina

Crescendo angina

Prinzmetal angina

Three types of angina

Unstable angina

Unstable angina occurs when the blood clot causes a reduced blood flow but not a total blockage. This means that the heart muscle supplied by the affected artery does not die (infarct).



Understanding the heart and coronary arteries

The heart is made mainly of special muscle. The heart pumps blood into blood vessels (arteries) which take the blood to every part of the body.
The coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart If these arteries are narrowed or blocked, the heart does not get enough oxygen.

This can cause angina or a heart attack. The blockage can be sudden and complete, or it can come and go – clot, break open, then clot again. “In either case, the heart tissue is dying, even if it’s just a few cells or a whole big section of the heart,” Bolger said.

Like any other muscle, the heart muscle needs a good blood supply. The coronary arteries take blood to the heart muscle. The main coronary arteries branch off from the aorta. The aorta is the large artery which takes oxygen-rich blood from the heart chambers to the body. The main coronary arteries divide into smaller branches which take blood to all parts of the heart muscle.

Understanding the heart and coronary arteries


The term ‘acute coronary syndrome’ covers a range of disorders, including a heart attack (myocardial infarction) and unstable angina, that are caused by the same underlying problem.
The underlying problem is a sudden reduction of blood flow to part of the heart muscle. This is usually caused by a blood clot that forms on a patch of atheroma within a coronary artery.

What is acute coronary syndrome (ACS)

The types of problems range from unstable angina to an actual myocardial infarction. In unstable angina a blood clot causes reduced blood flow but not a total blockage.

What is acute coronary syndrome (ACS)

Therefore, the heart muscle supplied by the affected artery does not die (infarct). The location of the blockage, the length of time that blood flow is blocked and the amount of damage that occurs determine the type of ACS.



Do you know the most critical numbers for your heart health? That knowledge could just save your life.

Women should follow a healthy lifestyle with all of the following:

  • Blood pressure less than 120/80 mm Hg and not on medicine for blood pressure
  • Total cholesterol less than 200 mg/dL and not on medicine for cholesterol
  • Fasting blood glucose less than 100 mg/dL and not on medicine for blood sugar
  • Body mass index less than 25 kg/m2 – Never smoked or quit over one year ago
  • Performs 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week
Performs 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week
Blood pressure less than 120/80 mm Hg and not on medicine for blood pressure
Body mass index less than 25 kg/m2 - Never smoked or quit over one year ago


Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) accounts for more than 25%  of infant deaths that are caused by birth defects.

Oximetry screening is a low-cost, highly-effective, and painless bedside test for newborns that can be completed in as little as 45 seconds.

Congenital heart disease screening for infants

The screening is administered using a pulse oximeter device, which is a light that shines through the skin to measure the percentage of oxygen in the blood.

All parents should ask for a pulse oximetry screening to be administered on all newborns.



Due to a family history or other risk factors, even a woman who has always thought of herself as perfectly healthy can find herself suddenly experiencing the symptoms of stroke.

What is a stroke

A stroke happens when either a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is blocked by a clot or the vessel bursts. When either of these occur, the brain does not receive the oxygen-rich blood it needs and brain cells begin to die, and quickly. That’s why it’s so important to know the signs and symptoms of stroke.

What is a stroke


Emirates Cardiac Society

SHARING MATTERS OF HEART

SHARING MATTERS OF HEART




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Emirates Cardiac Society (ECS) is a non-profit organization comprising of cardiologists within the UAE that work under the umbrella of the Emirates Medical Association.


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