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risk factors that can be controlled!

  • high blood pressure
  • smoking
  • high blood cholesterol
  • lack of regular activity
  • obesity or overweight
  • diabetes

risk factors you can’t be controlled

  • age
  • gender
  • heredity (family health history)
  • race
  • previous stroke or heart attack
high blood pressure
diabetes
high blood cholesterol
previous stroke or heart attack
race
gender
obesity or overweight
lack of regular activity
smoking
age
heredity (family health history)

What are the benefits of heart-healthy eating?

Eating a heart-healthy diet is important for managing your blood pressure and reducing your risk of heart attack, stroke and other health threats.

Get quality nutrition from healthy food sources

Aim to eat a diet that’s rich in:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole-grains
  • Low-fat dairy products
  • Skinless poultry and fish
  • Nuts and legumes
  • Non-tropical vegetable oils

Limit:

  • Saturated and trans fats
  • Sodium
  • Red meat (if you do eat red meat, compare labels and select the leanest cuts available)
  • Sweets and sugar
  • sweetened beverages


After the onset of menopause certain risk factors increase around the time of menopause and a high-fat diet, smoking or other unhealthy habits begun earlier in life can also take a toll.

Menopause and Heart Disease

Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke

Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke

Knowing your family’s health history can help you avoid both heart disease and stroke – the  No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death. Just because your family has a history of cardiovascular disease, does not mean that you will certainly have the same diseases, it just means that you are more likely to have them.

If your cardiovascular disease has stabilized, it is probably safe to have sex

If your cardiovascular disease has stabilized, it is probably safe to have sex

Ask your doctor before resuming sexual activity

Don’t be SHY!



Atherosclerosis & Stroke

Atherosclerosis is often referred to as “hardening of the arteries.” .It’s the process in which fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium and other substances build up in the inner lining of an artery. This buildup is called plaque.

Normal artery

Normal artery, Atherosclerosis & Stroke

Narrowing of artery

Narrowing of artery, Atherosclerosis & Stroke

Atherosclerosis is a slow, complex disease that typically starts in childhood and often progresses when people grow older. This disease progresses rapidly in some people in their 20s. In others, it doesn’t become a threat until they’ve reached their 50s or 60s.

Atherosclerosis & Stroke

Causes of atherosclerosis

People with a family history of premature cardiovascular disease have an increased risk of atherosclerosis. Other risk factors for atherosclerosis include:

Cigarette smoking

Cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke (the chemicals in cigarettes can cause damage to blood vessels accelerating the development of atherosclerosis)

High blood cholesterol

High blood cholesterol

High blood pressure

High blood pressure

Obesity and excess weight

Obesity and excess weight

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes mellitus

Physical inactivity

Physical inactivity

The inner lining of the artery, called the endothelium, can be damaged due to high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, toxic substances in cigarette smoke, high sugar levels, and other factors in the blood. High blood pressure can also cause damage to the inner lining of an artery. Once the blood vessel is damaged, atherosclerosis begins and a plaque forms.

the endothelium

the progress of the condition

Because of the damage, fats, cholesterol, platelets, cellular debris and calcium begin to deposit in the artery walls. These substances may stimulate the cells of the artery wall to produce still other materials. This results in more cells accumulating in the innermost layer of the artery wall where the atherosclerotic lesions form. These cells accumulate, and many divide. At the same time, fat builds up within and around these cells. They also form connective tissue. This buildup is called plaque. It usually affects large and medium-sized arteries. These cells and surrounding material thicken the endothelium significantly. The artery’s diameter shrinks and blood flow decreases, reducing oxygen supply.

the progress of the condition

How atherosclerotic plaque causes damage?

Plaques that rupture cause the formation of blood clots that can block blood flow or break off and travel to another part of the body. In either of these cases, if a clot blocks a blood vessel that feeds the heart, it causes a heart attack. If it blocks a blood vessel that feeds the brain, it causes a stroke. If blood supply to the arms or legs is reduced or blocked, it can cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene.

atherosclerosis

Stroke and atherosclerosis

There are two types of ischemic stroke caused by blood clots, narrowing of blood vessels to the brain caused by atherosclerosis or other particles. Atherothrombotic stroke is the most common stroke. It occurs when a blood clot forms on a atherosclerotic plaque within a blood vessel in the brain and blocks blood flow to that part of the brain.

Stroke and atherosclerosis

Cerebral embolism occurs when a wandering clot or some other particle, called an embolus, is carried by the bloodstream until it lodges in an artery leading to or in the brain and blocks the flow of blood. The embolism could be due to a piece of clot or plaque that broke off from an atherosclerotic plaque. However, most embolic strokes are due to blood clots that form during atrial fibrillation and enter the bloodstream.

most embolic strokes are due to blood clots that form during atrial fibrillation and enter the bloodstream.


  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, or trouble speaking or understanding
Sudden confusion, or trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness or loss of balance or coordination
Sudden trouble walking, dizziness or loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause
Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

You should never wait more than five minutes to call emergency if you experience even one of the signs above. Remember, you could be having a stroke even if you’re not experiencing all of the symptoms. And remember to check the time.

call emergency
call emergency

Call Emergency; Heart attack and stroke are life-or-death, every second counts.

If you suspect, you or someone you are with has any of the symptoms of heart attack or stroke immediately call emergency so an ambulance can be sent.

Also note that when someone experience a stroke, if given a clot-busting drug within 3 to 4.5 hours of the start of symptoms, it may improve the chances of getting better faster.



Heart Disease and Diabetes in Women

Your body gets most of its energy from glucose, a form of sugar that comes from some of the food you eat. If you have diabetes, it’s harder for your body to turn food into energy. That’s because the body either:

Heart Disease and Diabetes in Women

cannot produce enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas),

or both.

cannot use insulin (also called insulin resistance),

heart disease treatment in women and in men

Without enough insulin, glucose can’t enter the cells. Over time, the amount of glucose in your blood rises and cells are starved of energy. In addition to heart attack and stroke, uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to other health problems as well, such as blindness, kidney failure, and amputations.

Without enough insulin, glucose can’t enter the cells, Heart Disease and Diabetes in Women

Heart disease & diabetes often occur together. Whether you have heart disease or are at high risk of it, get your blood glucose (sugar) level checked regularly, especially if diabetes runs in your family.

Diabetes

Heart Disease and Diabetes in Women
  • 10.6 million women have diabetes (8 percent of all women ages 20 years and older)
  • 3 million women who have diabetes are undiagnosed.
  • 34.4 million women have pre-diabetes.
  • 14.6% of African-American women have diabetes.
  • 11.8% of Hispanic-American women have diabetes.
  • Prevalence for diabetes African American women is two times higher than in Caucasian women (14.6% of African-American women have diabetes while 6.1% of Caucasian women have diabetes)
Heart diseases and diabetes in women

Heart Disease

Heart Disease in Women
  • 43.8 million women are currently living with some form of cardiovascular disease. Nearly 7 million women have a history of heart attack and/or angina.
  • 6.6 million women are currently living with coronary heart disease (CHD).
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women and is responsible for 1 in 3 deaths in women annually.
Heart Disease in Women
  • Diabetes dramatically increases a woman’s chances of developing heart disease and having a heart attack and at much younger ages.
  • Diabetes erases the heart protective benefits of estrogen during child-bearing years.
Diabetes erases the heart protective benefits of estrogen during child-bearing years.
Women with diabetes are up to five times more likely to develop heart disease than women who don’t have diabetes.

Women with diabetes are up to five times more likely to develop heart disease than women who don’t have diabetes. Women with diabetes who have survived a heart attack are at much greater risk of having a second one compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes contributes to heart-related deaths.

Two out of three women with diabetes die from heart disease.

Two out of three women with diabetes die from heart disease.
Heart disease and diabetes in women

While the death rate from heart disease has dropped by 27 percent in women without diabetes, deaths from heart and blood vessel disease in women with diabetes have increased by 23 percent over the last 30 years.

Smoking doubles the risk for heart disease in people with diabetes.

Smoking doubles the risk for heart disease in people with diabetes.

2 out of 3 adults with diabetes report also having high blood pressure or taking prescription medications to lower their blood pressure.

2 out of 3 adults with diabetes report also having high blood pressure
  • Women with diabetes are 2.5 times more likely to have heart attacks.
  • The risk for stroke is 1.5 times higher among people with diabetes.
2 out of 3 adults with diabetes report also having high blood pressure or taking prescription medications

2 out of 3 adults with diabetes report also having high blood pressure or taking prescription medications

Know Your (Diabetes) ABCs

Know Your (Diabetes) ABCs

Your health care team will focus on controlling your blood sugar levels and lowering blood pressure and blood cholesterol, together with use of aspirin and other medications as indicated.

Know Your (Diabetes) ABCs

A

stands for A1C (a test that shows average blood glucose level over the past three months). Have this checked at least twice a year.

A1C target Below 7 percent

Know Your (Diabetes) ABCs , stands for A1C
High blood pressure is serious and can make your heart work too hard.

B

is for blood pressure. High blood pressure is serious and can make your heart work too hard.
Blood pressure target Below 130/80 mm Hg

C

is for cholesterol (lipids). Have it checked at least once a year.

Blood fat (cholesterol) targets LDL (bad) cholesterol Under 100 mg/dL Triglycerides Under 150 mg/dL HDL (good) cholesterol For men: above 40 mg/dL For women: above 50 mg/dL

is for cholesterol (lipids). Have it checked at least once a year.


Emirates Cardiac Society

SHARING MATTERS OF HEART

SHARING MATTERS OF HEART




About Us


Emirates Cardiac Society (ECS) is a non-profit organization comprising of cardiologists within the UAE that work under the umbrella of the Emirates Medical Association.


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